The Last Wish by Andrzej Sapkowski

“I manage because I have to. Because I’ve no other way out. Because I’ve overcome the vanity and pride of being different, I’ve understood that they are a pitiful defense against being different. Because I’ve understood that the sun shines differently when something changes. The sun shines differently, but it will continue to shine, and jumping at it with a hoe isn’t going to do anything.”

4/5 stars.
ebook, 288 pages.
Read from August 9, 2019 to August 13th, 2019.

I picked up all three Witcher games on a fantastic Steam sale this last summer when I found myself halfway through the first game and loving it, only to find out that the games are based off a book series! I was committing book blasphemy! And now, there is a Netflix series coming out this fall too. I had to read the books.

Geralt of Rivia is a Witcher. A mutant. An outcast. He is one of the few to pass the Witcher training and complete his mutation without dying giving him remarkable powers and strengths. His stark white hair has been stripped of its colour from the change and his eyes are slit like a cat. The tasks of a Witcher are to defeat the monsters of the world but as Geralt is coming to learn, sometimes the monsters aren’t what they seem. He questions his ethics and purpose as a Witcher as the world around him becomes more corrupt with not monsters, but people, who appear to be the evil ones.

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Definitely crushing on this handsome gent.

This book is touted as a collaboration of short stories but it read more like a novel as the stories related to each other and followed a general chronological order, however, you could easily have read each chapter in and of its self. Geralt is a fantastically dynamic character and the writing paints the realm of Witchers so vividly. Even in translation, the writing is concise and engaging. The book lends itself well to the first Witcher game as you get to play out some of the more elaborate plot points from this book in the game itself.

I am ecstatic to have found another fantasy series that I’m in love with and I will definitely be devouring every book in this series. I would recommend this book to any fantasy lover and especially those who want to play the video games as you’re able to get the full pictures and scope on Geralt and his adventures. Needless to say, I don’t plan on leaving the Witcher world anytime soon.

 

The Psychology of Zelda by Anthony Bean

Can we talk about how gorgeous the cover art is for this book? Made me want to read this book even more.

4/5 stars.
ebook, 256 pages.
Read from March 12, 2019 to March 20, 2019.

Ocarina of Time was it for me, the magical game that got me hooked on gaming forever. It’s a game that I still play to this day and the reason I will never part with my trusty N64 console or my 3DS. I’ve gone on to play a large portion of the Legend of Zelda series since Ocarina of Time and these games have forever become a part of who I am. Each game has marked different moments in my life while also helping to keep my imagination alive and provide a safe space for me to relax. It’s a reliable world that I can always lose myself in no matter what’s going on. Many fans of the series feel the same so it’s no surprise that there would be interesting psychology behind this beloved series.

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Breath of the Wild, Released March 2017

I saw this book being promoted on one of the Zelda fan pages I follow on Facebook and was immediately captivated by the cover art. It’s absolutely stunning. Having always wanted to dive into the psychology of this game and explore my own intense interests in the game, I made a frantic search and request for this book on Netgalley.

This book is a collection of essays by psychologists and similar professionals who also have a passion and academic interesting in video gaming. Each essay broaches a different topic in the game. From the analysis of Link’s hero archetype, the reason why Link never speaks a word, the role of the notorious Dark Link, the structure of the music in the game and how it affects gamers, and the changing role of Zelda over the years, to themes of grief and depression present in Majora’s Mask, this collaboration of essays touches every aspect of the game despite its short length.

The essays are quite academic in nature but I wasn’t expecting anything less, though it seems some readers were a bit put off by this. I think it would have been disappointing if the essays didn’t have enough factual references. I particularly enjoyed the section on Majora’s Mask and the different stages of grief. This one essay alone stands out and is worth getting this book for this essay alone. Majora’s Mask was and still is unique from the rest of the Zelda games for its approach to these darker themes and the fact that it is the only game that has been made as a direct sequel (Ocarina of Time). There are some repetitive facts in relation to Carl Jung as he is discussed in at least 2 or 3 different essays. There is also some repetition with the game quote selection used in the essays as well.

You don’t need to be a psychology major to appreciate this book as the analysis is laid out in a straight-forward and easy to understand manner. Overall this was a quality read and if you love Zelda and are interested in an academic analysis of the games and their themes this is a worthwhile little read.