Solutions and Other Problems by Allie Brosh

“Sometimes all you can really do is keep moving and hope you end up somewhere that makes sense.”

5/5 stars.
ebook, 384 pages.
Read from December 17, 2020 to December 18, 2020

Allie Brosh took the internet by storm with her blog and book Hyperbole and a Half in the mid-2000s. Her comics perfectly captured life’s random mishaps and the strange things we did in childhood, as well as accurately describing what life is like living with depression. Allie disappeared for almost seven years shortly after her fame. What happened to her? Solutions and Other Problems captures the difficult time that Allie went through in her silence along with hilarious insights and more intriguing and ridiculous things about childhood.

Allie had planned to release another book within a year or two after Hyperbole and a Half but then tragedy happened. Her sister died suddenly. This was then followed by the end of a long term relationship and with Allie having to contend with some serious health issues, all of which she includes and reflects on in this book. A triple whammy of difficulties and pain, so it’s no wonder she became reclusive. It didn’t help that her email and social media was also hacked into at one point. This book takes on these major transitions in her life. It includes comics about her childhood as she remembers her sister and how she managed to get through some of the most difficult years of her life. Her story is relatable, potent, hilarious, and grounding. I should also add that while there are some very sad parts in this book it is still very much a comedy and that Allie’s trademark humour is present throughout.

The best part about this book is that it is deeply insightful and offers an intimate glimpse into Allie’s experiences and the things that have shaped her as an artist while still being immensely engaging and entertaining. It’s a book that shows how Allie has grown as a person and an artist. Allie has also come to see how much of an impact her work has had on others and just how much other people care about her. I also think that this book was healing for Allie and was less about what her fans wanted and more about what she needed. Many fans did not connect with this book as much as her first for this reason but I feel that not only was this book necessary but an authentic effort from Allie that reached an even wider audience. 

This book was absolutely worth the wait and completely captures the growing pains of grief and coming into your own despite life’s intense difficulties at times.

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

“Three words, large enough to tip the world. I remember you.”

4/5 stars.
ebook, 502 pages.
Read from November 23, 2020 to November 26, 2020.

Another great library find! This book was exactly what I needed during a difficult time. I’ve read a lot of reviews on this book since finishing it and I can see that many readers didn’t jive with this book but for me, it was the perfect escape and I’m going to stand behind the praise I’m going to give it.

This story starts in the early 1700s in a small village in France in which a young Addie makes a frantic decision to avoid being forcefully married off. Despite the warnings of her grandmother, she makes a deal with one of the old gods during the night, of which nothing good can come. She wants the ability to live her own life by her own rules and commits to living forever until she is tired of living of which she will then give up her soul to this bargain maker. The catch with this deal is that no one will ever remember her. Not her family, not anyone she meets, she will always be forgotten. At first, Addie is crushed by her choice since her own family has no recollection of who she is and is cast out of their home. The first part of her immortality is full of misery and strife until she comes to use this forgetfulness to her own advantage. Her story spans across centuries and different countries with the god, Luc, constantly trying to find ways to get her to give up her immortal life. Their relationship turns into a complex one as Luc is the only being that knows and remembers her causing Addie to both desire his company and be repulsed by it at the same time. Addie, however, is content and is constantly in awe at the possibilities and experiences that the world has to offer and she finds innovative ways she can make an impact and inspire others. She has commanded her life and her freedom as she sees fit and yet… and yet she still yearns to have someone remember her. Everything changes when she meets Henry in a bookshop who remembers her name. She hasn’t heard her name on the lips of someone mortal in centuries. So why does this one man remember her after hundreds of years of passing through people’s lives?

“Books, she has found, are a way to live a thousand lives–or to find strength in a very long one.”

Addie’s character and the dynamics with both Henry and Luc were my favourite part of this story. The writing is subtle in building these relationships creating a slower burner of tension and anticipation. The writing is elegant and references history and art in an intriguing way while also creating a journey and characters that you want to follow. I found the story compelling and easy to read. It made me feel at ease and gave me something to look forward to during a sad time in my life. While I see some other readers struggled with the story and/or characters in this book it was perfect for what I needed and I anticipate it will be a book I will read again as it was a wonderful story to escape into. The story is character-heavy but highly imaginative and is an ideal book to lose yourself in amidst this pandemic. This book reminds me of The Time Traveler’s Wife but with more whimsical elements and I think if you enjoyed that story you will likely also find something this one.

I’m Thinking of Ending Things by Iain Reid

You will be scared. But you won’t know why…

4/5 stars.
ebook, 183 pages.
Read November 16, 2020 to November 19, 2020.

If you have read this book and want to watch the Netflix show, DO NOT WATCH IT. I mean, even if you haven’t read the book I wouldn’t recommend watching the show. It was overly artsy, extremely drawn-out, boring, and missed all the best aspects and feel of the book. However, the book, I assure you is worth reading so just stick with that. A friend recommended this book, and when I first started reading it began as a typical relationship-based fiction but then, oh man, was I in for a surprise.

Jake and his girlfriend are on a road trip to meet Jake’s parents for the first time. The narration is from the girlfriend’s perspective and takes on a stream of consciousness approach as she ruminates about ending the relationship during the snowy ride over the family home.

“I’m thinking of ending things. Once this thought arrives, it stays. It sticks. It lingers. It’s always there. Always.

Jake once said, “Sometimes a thought is closer to truth, to reality, than an action. You can say anything, you can do anything, but you can’t fake a thought.”

And here’s what I’m thinking: I don’t want to be here.”

Outside of a strange reoccurring phone call and message the girlfriend keeps receiving, the road trip itself seems fairly normal until the couple gets to their destination. From there the narrative begins to show frays before completely unravelling during the detour on the trip home that finds Jake and his girlfriend trapt and lost in his old high school. As the girlfriend’s thought process progresses, she explores the inner depths of the psyche that covers everything from existentialism, intelligence, death, being alone, relationships, and mental illness.

“People talk about the ability to endure. To endure anything and everything, to keep going, to be strong. But you can do that only if you’re not alone. That’s always the infrastructure life’s built on. A closeness with others. Alone it all becomes a struggle of mere endurance.”

As the story spirals you come to realise that there is more to story than was initially present. The narrator becomes increasingly unclear all while you’re being sucked into this terrifying psyche. It’s a masterful psychological thriller that allows you to enter the mind of someone on the edge of ruminating between their perceived failings in life and the choice of death.

“What if suffering doesn’t end with death? How can we know? What if it doesn’t get better? What if death isn’t an escape? What if the maggots continue to feed and feed and feed and continue to be felt? This possibility scares me.”

I was on the absolute edge of my seat reading the last quarter of this book. I wasn’t sure if I wanted it all to end while also wanting to get through the anxiety-inducing plot as quickly as possible. It’s not often a book can produce that kind of effect, which is exactly what the Netflix show lacked, especially because it threw in random dance sequences and musical numbers at the pinnacle part of the story that was supposed to be terrifying. Needless to say, I vehemently hated the Netflix adaptation. The book is short, immensely poignant, brilliantly written. It can feel slightly convoluted at times because it’s hard to follow some of the thought processes as the plot comes undone but the feeling this book creates is consistent and remains long after you’ve finished reading. The story pulls you in until you find yourself within its inescapable hole. Arguably, I could also see why some people may not have enjoyed it for the same reasons.

I would recommend this book for those who enjoy psychological fiction and thriller and thought-provoking plots with a thriller or horror twist.