Rise of the King by R.A. Salvatore

“We seek goals as if their achievement will grant magical happiness and unending fulfillment, but is that ever the case?”

3/5 stars.
ebook, 368 pages.
Read from June 22, 2020 to July 5, 2020.

Book 26, I never thought I’d make this far in the series. Salvatore has recently published his 33rd book in the Legend of Drizzt series, meaning that I have still have a comfortable number of books for my guilty pleasure series to fall back on for at least a little while longer.

Drizzt continues on with his companions to free Pwent before continuing their journey towards Mithral Hall. The Orcs, driven by the manipulative Dark Elves, are rallying to start a major battle against, well, everyone. No one yet knows the threat that’s coming. Drizzt still wonders if the whole expedition is the right thing to do but he owes it to his friends. Jarlaxle makes another appearance again as well as he attempts to reunite with Drizzt and his friends while also trying to avoid getting to caught up in the Dark Elve’s plans.

Regis was by far the most badass character in this novel and I hope that we get to see his character continue to expand. Dragons also make another appearance in this book adding some much needed excitement to the plot. Despite that, this story felt a little muddy, as have the last few books in the series since the Companions have returned. I feel less invested in the majoity of characters or the reemerging battle that is coming against the Orcs again, a plot point I never though needed to be brought up again. I’m not convinced that Bruenor and Cattibrie are correct about the Orcs and I’m disappointed that the Many-Arrows plot is continuing this way.

Here’s hoping the last book of this particular trilogy will bring what the last two books have lacked. I’m also excited to get to some of the newer books that Salvatore has published in this series as I think they will have the vigor and passion that these last few books are missing,

Fangs by Sarah Andersen

This modern take on a classic romantic theme details another side to the author’s artistry and creative storytelling skills which step outside her previous style of comics.

4/5 stars.
ebook, 77 pages.
Read July 10, 2020.

If you spend any time on the internet then you’re likely already familiar with the author of this graphic novel. Sarah Andersen is the author of the infamous Sarah’s Scribbles, which are short relatable and funny comic strips involving a cartooned version of the author. Complete with the author’s trademark humour, Fangs is very different from the Scribble’s series both in its medium and content. The author takes a familiar concept but with a unique and intimate approach.

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Fangs is a love story between a vampire and a werewolf. The story starts with their first date and then follows their lives as their romance progresses. It’s a wonderfully simple concept and story with beautiful results. Each page is a scene in an of its self and presents a moment in time in this unique relationship. Some scenes are dark and reveal glimpses of the monsters that each of them can be but most scenes are cute, quirky, funny, romantic, and just downright delightful.

bd85b41054436cb8f17d8df0b154baabThis modern take on a classic romantic theme details another side to the author’s artistry and creative storytelling skills which step outside her previous style of comics. The story is immensely captivating and can speak to a wide range of readers with its content. You don’t need to like the supernatural genre to appreciate the story and the characters that the author succinctly builds in this short but engaging graphic novel. The story touches on the nuisances of love and building a long and committed relationship with both its ups and downs, as well as the added intrigue of the supernatural realm and drawing on our natural curiosity of this sort of romance. The novel’s presentation and engagement also makes you want to revisit the story again and again. I think my only wish with this story was that it was longer and that I wanted the story to continue further than it did.

If you want to read this book ASAP, as I did, you’re in luck. You can read it online completely for free off Tapas. By visiting this site you’re also supporting the author so it’s a win-win. If you loved the series as much as I did, you can also support the author by purchasing a hard copy of the book.

The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins

“Nothing you can take from me was ever worth keeping.”

3/5 stars.
ebook, 528 pages.
Read from June 23, 2020 to June 28, 2020.

I was surprised at how little hype this book generated considering the popularity of The Hunger Games series. I saw it pop up on Goodreads and thought to myself, how did I only hear about this book now?! The book is a prequel The Hunger Game series and is meant to answer many of the questions fans had about the Hunger Games themselves and the world created by the author. Questions like how The Hunger Games came to be, how the war shaped the districts and how Coriolanus Snow came to be the awful man that is depicted in the series.

The war has recently ended and The Hunger Games is the new punishment that the Capitol has come up with for the uprise of the districts. In its infancy, the contestants of The Hunger Games are not celebrities like they are in the games of Katniss’ era. They are starved and tortured and as a result, the districts care little to watch their friends and neighbours suffer on television. Coriolanus Snow is just 18 years old and his family is out of money after the war despite his family’s long and illustrious history within the Capitol. He is, however, an excellent student and has been selected to help mentor this year’s Hunger Games, something that has never been done before. Coriolanus is initially disappointed as he is given the district 12 girl, Lucy, of which he initially believes that she will have no chance of winning thus effecting his placement and potential scholarship into further schooling as well as the future of his family. However, there is something about this girl as she manages to capture the media’s attention with a snake mishap and when she sings and performs a song after her selection. Her ability to win the crowd is intriguing and Coriolanus is nothing if not adaptable and seizes the opportunity to use this to his advantage. He eventually comes to care deeply for his tribute and begins to question the essence of the games and their moral purpose.

I mostly enjoyed this novel. It was interesting to get the back story on The Hunger Games and the growth of Coriolanus Snow however, this book was way too long. It’s clear the author was able to get away with a longer novel due to the success of her previous novels. I believe this novel would have been more successful had the story been halved. Further, the characters were not as robust as they were in the other books. Lucy could have been an extremely interesting character but she just fell flat for me and I didn’t feel as invested in her as I did with, say, Katniss. I was unsure of her motives and how she was able to trust Coriolanus the way she did. I just did not feel as invested in Lucy’s story or in that of Coriolanus’ since he true character started to show fairly quickly and if you’ve read the remainder of the series, you already know what type of person he becomes which steals some of the intrigue this story could have had.

I think the fans of The Hunger Games series were hoping for something that was equally as good and exciting and I, unfortunately, don’t think this novel quite met that need. If you are a fan of the series, however, this book is still worth reading especially if you had questions or wanted to know more about the history around The Hunger Games.