Project Dermatillomania by Laura Barton

5/5 stars.
Paperback, Colour Edition, 100 pages.
Read on March 14, 2014 .

I won’t toot my own horn too much here (as I am a contributor to this awesome novel) but for people who suffer or who have suffered from Dermatillomania this book is one of the first of its kind. Project Dermatillomania is written by people who know this disorder and deal with it everyday. They know what it feels like to be alone with the condition and through their own bravery and dedication all came together to share their stories to help others know that there is hope. These stories are personal, they’re artistic, beautiful and raw; ranging from pieces of art, graphic design, pictures and poetry from people from all over the world. They give an insight to the turmoils of Dermatillomania which is meant to be standing point of hope for sufferers and a basis of understanding and a resource for those that love them.

Having worked with all the people who helped bring this book together has been a blessing and I have made some great friends. I’m very proud of myself and of each of the individuals who have made this book possible. I highly recommend this book for anyone with Dermatillomania or for anyone who loves someone with Dermatillomania. Here is the purchase information:

All proceeds to be donated to the Canadian BFRB Support Network and the Trichotillomania Learning Center.
B&W Edition – Purchase – S13.99
Colour Edition – Purchase – $20.19
***An ebook edition is currently in the works***

If you have any questions or comments about the book please feel free to ask me. You can also reach out to:

Stupid Children by Lenore Zion

4/5 stars.
ebook, 176 pages.
Read from March 09 to 12, 2014.

This book, if you’re looking for something different, is it. Stupid Children is a dark-humoured book that focuses on the psychological traumas of a girl named Jane. After her mother died, her father was never quite the same. At a very young age her father was placed in a mental institution and she into the foster care system. Her tragedy continues as the home that she is placed into is a part of a cult called the “Second Day Believers”. The cult focuses on cleansing out the “mental impurities” of children and then it throws in some farm animal organs, drugs, sex and a weird ranking system of its members.

The book is written from the perspective of Jane as an adult, accounting her experiences and relationships to a psychologist and as well to the reader. This unique psychologist-narrative provides a potent perspective and, based on the mixed reviews this book has received, didn’t work for every reader. I felt however, that the style was pulled off very well.

Fast paced and quirky, the story focus on how non-nonchalantly Jane discusses her not-so-normal upbringing, the experiences she gets into with her friends and father-daughter relationships.  The characters are immensely likeable. There are some scenes that are so well described in the book that at first glance may not be directly related to the story but they allow the reader to gain entry into the emotional state of the characters. There are some amazing scenes that really give the reader a full extent of some of the psychological damage Jane endures and how she handles it. The scenes aren’t funny and they’re not tragic but they’re very raw.

I really couldn’t put this book down and I can say that it’s been the best read of 2014 for me so far. I actually had the privilege of participating in an author/reader discussion with Lenore Zion on this book. What I was able to learn is that Lenore herself is a psychologist and her influences for the book came from her dreams and a desire to let readers know what it’s like to be a therapist in a way.

The influence came from my dreams. I have a very rich dream world (and fantasy world) and I’ve been keeping a dream journal for years. It’s a bit egomaniacal, but my unconscious is fascinating to me – as is the unconscious of all human beings. We are brilliant and bizarre creatures. I wanted to write a book that allowed the reader to feel what it is sometimes like to be a therapist. Questioning things like “why is my client smiling while telling me this horrible, traumatic memory?” and “why does my client keep coming up with rationalizations to defend her abusers?” I work with a lot of trauma in my field, so these are things I have dissected psychologically for quite some time.” –  Lenore Zion, in a TNBBC Author/Reader Discussion

Lenore’s work as a psychologist is blatant in this novel and it adds such a fantastic and unique perspective that I don’t think readers will find anywhere elsewhere.  A highly recommended read for those who are looking for a something a little off-beat and awesome!

Skin Picking: The Freedom to Finally Stop by Annette Pasternak

5/5 stars.
ebook, 148 pages.
Read from January 17 to March 07, 2014.

This book is by far the most comprehensive, supportive and positive guide out there right now for Dermatillomania. I can’t say enough good things about this book!

For those that don’t know, Dermatillomania, or Excoriation disorder, can be defined as:

…an impulse control disorder characterized by the repeated urge to pick at one’s own skin, often to the extent that damage is caused. Research has suggested that the urge to pick is similar to an obsessive compulsive disorder but others have argued that for some the condition is more akin to substance abuse disorder. The two main strategies for treating this condition are pharmacological and behavioral intervention.” – Wikipedia

This is a condition that I have personally struggled with deeply. I can safely say that through my own methods I was able to battle this condition for the most part and I am now an advocate for awareness and support. I wish that this book existed during my most troublesome times as I definitely would have battled the worst of the condition a lot sooner with this kind of help. This book has truly provided me with the final resources that I needed in order to say goodbye to this habit forever.

***Just some quick shameless self-promotion here: I’ve actually recently published my story in a collaborative book called Project Dermatillomania that’s available for purchase now. ***

I took a long time reading this book in order to go through all of the motions, guides, suggestions and exercises so that I could give it a good comprehensive review. I can honestly say that if you follow Annette’s methods, you WILL get results!

So many people find themselves completely controlled and at a loss with this disorder. It’s a helpless feeling. This book shows you how to get back that power, and more importantly, that you cannot define yourself as this disorder and cannot submit to its definition. It shows positive strategies to curb your urges and shows you that in order to fully tackle the habit you must determine the emotional reasons and routines for carrying out the vicious cycle of picking.

It is imperative to go beyond these labels and reveal how chronic skin picking plays a part in each individual’s life” p. 18

You may be genetically predisposed to a condition but that does not mean you are powerless over it.” p. 27

People start picking for so many reasons but it’s always to find relief. Often times it’s a matter of dealing with stress because we haven’t found other methods of doing so. One thing that Annette stresses is the readiness for a person to stop picking. It’s hard thing to admit and even harder to give up something that feels good and that you’ve relied on for so long. Her book not only provide methods with how to start this process but how to keep a long standing positive replacement to the picking.

Stopping skin picking is hard. Is that any reason to feel badly about yourself? NO.” p. 16

In summary, her programs focuses and takes the reader through these steps:

  1. How to stop victimizing and beating yourself out. Forgiveness and acceptance is crucial.
  2. You are not powerless to this condition and you can stop. In order to stop you need to accept this.
  3. Track your picking in a habit log. This is the one part that she stress the most. If you aren’t able to recognize the feelings associated with picking as well as when and where they occur you’re not going to able to stop it before it begins.
  4. Recognizing your negative thoughts and behaviours.  Retraining how you think is necessary for overcoming this as most of the time urges come from an unnecessary uncertainty or beliefs.
  5. Actual techniques to block and prevent urges. Gloves, toys, exercise, meditation etc, and just why they work.
  6. Long standing methods to deal with your stress and emotions in a healthy positive way. Annette takes a very holistic approach.
  7. Other things that could contribute and make your urges worse (sugar and alcohol etc).

Compassion oozes from this book. Annette herself used to struggle and live with this disorder herself so she completely understands what every sufferer goes through. Her writing is so gentle and soothing. She knows that we’re all going to mess up but that there is still progress and success in each mess up and mistake.

Practice makes better… Practice makes permanent” p. 137

What I believe makes this book the best resource out there is that it’s the first to really go into the emotional sides as to why people pick and tackles those issues directly as a step for overcoming this disorder. In my own struggles, that was the only thing that worked for me after countless other resources. Overcoming this disorder is truly a process of steps and Annette can take you through them. She provides so many additional resources in terms of supplements and other reading material as well. What makes it even better is that Annette is a life coach and personally deals with helping her clients combat this particular disorder. You can find more information about her services on her website.

For those that are affected by this disorder, please, PLEASE, read this book!