Homes: A Refugee Story by Abu Bakr al Rabeeah

This is why we need books. How else could we, being privileged to be born in a safe country, possibly know what a person like Abu Bakr has been through.

4/5 stars.
ebook, 136 pages.
Read on February 5, 2019.

For those that know nothing about this book going into it, as I did, I encourage you to keep it that way because by the time I got to the end I was blown away on how this novel came to be. Also, I don’t know about you but as a Canadian, this book fills me with pride knowing that we are continuing to make this kind of impact, especially considering the current political atmosphere. I read this book in one sitting because I was so in awe of Abu Bakr’s story.

canada-reads-2019-chuck-comeau
Chuck Comeau will be defending Homes during the debates on March 25-28, 2019.

This is the first book in the Canada Reads 2019 shortlist that I have read so far. Will it take the cake during the debates? We will find out.

 

Abu Bakr and his family were originally from Iraq but when tensions turned violent over Shias and the Sunnis his father made the decision to move to Syria in hopes of a safer and better life. Abu Bakr is just a boy when he makes this move and initially, he is filled with excitement as it means that he gets to be close to his cousins. However, this safe haven turns into a war zone under president Assad and Abu Bakr’s childhood is robbed from him as he comes into his teenage years knowing the sounds of bullets, the colour of blood and ripped flesh, as well as intense grief and fear as it rips through Syria. Abu Bakr’s father had a plan from the start when they moved to Syria and it was to get on a refugee list with the UN. He was diligent and he called all the time to try and get his family somewhere safer. His diligence eventually pays off but it still comes with a steep emotional fee for Abu Bakr and his family.

Once in Canada Abu Bakr and his family face a new set of trials, starting with learning English since none of them speak a word. Here Abu Bakr gives an honest account of his first-time experiences in Canada and how he learned to connect with others through soccer.

So here is where I think the spoiler is, as I am reading this book I got the impression that Abu Bakr is full grown man discussing his childhood and how he came to live in Canada with his remarkable and tragic story. Then I get to the acknowledgements I come to realize that Abu Bakr is still a high school student and has only been in Canada a few years! With the help of his English teacher, Winnie Yeung, the two of them create this moving story of his journey to Canada.  What an achievement! I mean, what the hell were you doing when you his age? Certainly not learning how to survive in a war-ridden and death-filled country and then learning another language to write a selling novel about the whole ordeal. This is why we need books. How else could we, being privileged to be born in a safe country, possibly know what a person like Abu Bakr has been through. How can we come to appreciate what we have with gratitude? We listen and we read.

For anyone that doesn’t understand the refugee crisis and supports closing borders, I beg you to read a few more books like this one. Stories of immigration and refugees in Canada are becoming more prominent and it’s because it’s becoming a part of who we are and their stories are becoming ours. This book felt extra special to me as Abu Bakr moved to a city that’s three hours away from where I grew up and knowing that he has had a positive experience with Canadians warms my heart. I would highly recommend this light, short, and moving read for any Canadians. I would also extend this book recommendation to any Americans who want to know more about the positive experiences of keeping your borders open.

We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

“What does “feminism” mean today? That is the question at the heart of “We Should All Be Feminists…””

4/5 stars.
ebook, 32 pages.
Read September 20, 2018

I can’t recall how I found this short essay but I’m really glad I did. I have often a wondered what exactly feminism means today? Especially in this volatile political environment. How can we as women explain our situation to the many men (and some women) who still don’t think that it is a relevant position to take a stand on in the present day? Well, I think the continued awareness and prevalence of rape culture, that a misogynist is the American president, how toxic masculinity is creating more and more troubled men, and the potential uproar over women’s basic rights in first world countries and all over the globe is more than enough time to consider how important feminism still is. This essay is important, so much so that I wish I could casually hand a copy of this to nearly everyone I know.  Essays like this should be required reading in high school and universities everywhere. 

“Some people ask: “Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?” Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general—but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women.”

How do you persuade people to understand a point of view? You explain how your point of view will benefit them and to not attack them for their current views. Chimamanda finds this wonderful balance between stating facts firmly to diffusing difficult aspects of feminism with grace and humour. She discusses the marginalization of men and women and the archaic beliefs that shape this discrimination, while also recognizing that we’re all unconsciously shaped by our culture so it’s easy to get caught up in what’s perceived as normal. Feminism is here to help us dismantle the beliefs that no longer benefit us in society, and that’s for both men and women. Feminism is not something to be feared, as many men do, as there is a history has a prevalence of fearmongering when it comes to women empowering themselves and others. 

“We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls, you can have ambition, but not too much. You should aim to be successful, but not too successful. Otherwise, you would threaten the man. “

In end, people will believe what they want to believe. You cannot move people like Trump and those who follow him, but for the rest of us that want better for humanity and are constantly trying to understand and improve, this essay is a wonderful, pervasive and persuasive read. 

“A world of happier men and happier women who are truer to themselves. And this is how to start: We must raise our daughters differently. We must also raise our sons differently.” 

Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer

“It was titillating to brush up against the enigma of mortality, to steal a glimpse across its forbidden frontier. Climbing was a magnificent activity, I firmly believed, not in spite of the inherent perils, but precisely because of them.”

4/5 stars.
ebook, 368 pages.
Read from June 29, 2018 to July 4, 2018.

Is weird that this novel made me interested in trying climbing? I suppose as an endurance runner there is a weird thrill that comes with the ultimate challenge and fighting through pain and exhaustion. It sounds crazy for many people but it is a rare exhilaration and achievement that can’t be replicated.

I knew little about the 1996 disaster on Everest as I was a child when it happened but this book does its best at giving an honest account of the event. No one will really know with exact precision what happened that day but Krakauer is effective with his research and recollection and in being as genuine as possible, making it easy for the reader to believe his version of events.

In May of 1996 a group of strangers set out to climb Mount Everest on a guided expedition, Krakauer among them with the intention of writing an article he was commissioned to do for Outside magazine on the commercialization of climbing Everest. During this time, climbing Everest had started to become a popular accomplishment for people who had money. With a great guide, the premise was that anyone could climb Everest which demeaned the accomplishment for many seasoned climbers.

“Getting to the top of any given mountain was considered much less important than how one got there: prestige was earned by tackling the most unforgiving routes with minimal equipment, in the boldest style imaginable.”

After a gruelling few days of acclimatization to high-altitudes, a few groups set out for the summit but a storm was brewing and it resulted in some groups having to make the ascent back through the brutal storm. Not everyone makes it back alive. Eight people died in that blizzard which contributed the deadliest seasons Everest had ever seen prior the avalanche in 2014.

Functioning at high altitudes with limited oxygen does hard things to a person. Your brain does not function as well and your body is only fueling what it has to in order to survive. If you ever wondered why your guts struggle after being on an airplane for an extended amount of time, just imagine what it’s like trying to scale Everest at those same altitudes.  Add in intense physical exhaustion and cold, along with impaired brain function, it’s a wonder that people make it back at all from these types of excursions. Some people have better genes, like the Sherpas, that are more capable of functioning at higher altitudes but most never know how they will handle this type of extreme situation. Especially when it comes to life or death.

Krakauer has a fuzzy memory about the last time he saw one of his teammates on the descent from Everest as it ended up being the last time he was seen alive. It is a memory that continues to haunt Krakauer as he has tried to clarify and make sense of those final moments for himself and for the family members of his lost teammate. The version of this book includes an additional commentary on a book that was released to counter Krakauer’s. Anatoli Boukreev, a guide on the expedition, found fault with how Krakauer portrayed him and certain events so he published his own book titled, The Climb: Tragic Ambitions on Everest.  A feud between the two men continued until Boukreev’s untimely death on another climbing expedition in which Krakauer gracefully and respectfully comments on as well.

Krakauer is a talented and humble writer. I cannot imagine the pain of living through such a traumatic ordeal and being able to write about with such grace.  His story is gripping and reels you into the niche world of climbing. Krakauer makes you feel like you are right there on Everest with him as he battles to keep his mind, emotions and body in check. Krakauer was criticized for a variety of things following the aftermath of the event and somehow managed to keep his cool. This book offers an extremely unique perspective not found in many other narratives, especially for a non-fiction, so I would highly recommend this book to fellow-thrill seekers, athletes or just those looking for an adventurous and inciteful read.