Canada Reads 2020 Postponed

Due to the rising concerns on the COVID-19 virus, Canada Reads 2020 has been cancelled.

Due to the rising concerns on the COVID-19 virus, Canada Reads 2020 has been cancelled. While I’m happy to have more time finish the books I am also surprised. I think the debates could have easily gone forward without a live audience but maybe it’s the debaters themselves as they might have some travel history that would require self-quarantine during the time of the debates.  There is no word on when the debates will resume.

Things here in Hong Kong are starting to calm as the virus here passed. Toilet paper, sanitiser and cleaning supplies are in ample stock here again. Now the rest of the world is going through the same panic. Hong Kong measures, based on past experiences with SARS, have proved effective in keeping numbers of the virus down to a minimum. I used to scoff at the idea of wearing a face mask but with literally everyone in Hong Kong wearing them and generally keeping to themselves with proper hand hygiene we’ve managed to keep our germs to ourselves.

Stay vigilant and healthy!

Ghetto at the Center of the World by Gordon Mathews

Likely the most fascinating place in Hong Kong with some of the best South Asian food in the city. Chungking Mansions is a curiosity that is not to be missed.

3/5 stars.
Paperback, 256 pages.
Read from June 25, 2019 to July 3, 2019.

I’ve called Hong Kong home for a few years now and have come to love it for all of its unique flaws and qualities. Hong Kong is a busy city but outside of its city walls are beautiful running trails, beaches, and hikes. There is something for everyone in this diverse city no matter what kind of person you are. As an expat, Chungking Mansions is a fascinating place that needs to be visited at least once, but for locals, it is generally a place to be avoided. The stories of crime and gang activity, along with the lack of familiar local faces, usually are enough to keep many locals away. However, this impression of Chungking Mansion isn’t its whole story.

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Grey facade – Photo by Gerald Figal on Flickr

Gordon Mathews is a university professor in Hong Kong and spent years living in and studying the people and it’s unique economy and isolated globalization. Chungking Mansion is located in the bustling and wealthy Tsim Sha Tsui area of Hong Kong on the Kowloon side. It’s a popular district for shopping and has lots of tourists from mainland China and elsewhere from around the globe. Yet inside Chungking mansions is like entering a different world. Just outside of the building, you’ll find it brimming with South Asians, who, if you’re white, will try and sell you knock-off watches, handbags, or tailoring services. Inside the building is old and run down compared to the shiny shopping area it’s surrounded by. Inside you’ll find cheap rooms for rent, refugees, illegal workers, traders, sex workers, drug addicts, and small businesses from all around the globe. African traders come to find cheap cellphones to bring back to their countries. South Asians come, often illegally, to try and improve the quality of their lives as well as their families. Many refugees come and get trapped in the system of long waits within Hong Kong and are unable to work legally too. Despite the illegality of most of what goes on in the building, a blind eye is often turned by police. Without the illegality of workers and many other trades, Chungking Mansions would not exist. The diversity of the building makes for some of the most eclectic and delicious food in Hong Kong and for rock-bottom prices. It also makes for a unique area of globalization that isn’t really seen anywhere else in the world.

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Image from Asia Times

I’ve actually had the pleasure of dining in Chungking Mansions with a group of refugees and have nothing but great things to say about the place despite its seedy reputation. I would go back in there in heartbeat for the great food, company, and people watching. That isn’t to say that sketchy things don’t happen at Chungking but in general, it’s a decent place to grab a good bite to eat provided you don’t mind how run down some of the establishments are.

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Image from Wikimedia

This book is a perfect insight into Chungking Mansions as its clear that the professor himself has become an established name inside the building and is someone that everyone seems to be comfortable talking with. He seems to have a clear understanding of Chungking Mansions and the people that live there. The novel felt a bit like something I would read in a university class but that’s not surprising since I’m sure that was one of the reasons it was written. Mathew’s writing is as informative as it is fascinating and if you’re in Hong Kong and have ever wanted to visit or know more about Chungking Mansions I would highly recommend this book.

Canada Reads 2019 Favs and Predictions

Wooooooo! It’s almost time for the Canada Reads 2019 debates and I’m ready to give you the down-low on what books I think are going to take the cake this year and which ones I thought were the best.

The theme this year is “One Book to Move You” so let’s have a look at which book I think will win this year.

Don’t like my picks?  Have your say and vote now for your favourite now! 



Predictions for the 2019 Canada Reads Winner:

You know it’s really hard to put different types of books against each other. I’ve said it before but I think Canada Reads should pick a type of book for each debate and stick to it. For example, all memoirs, all YA, or all dystopians for example, as it would just be more efficient, effective, and easier to pick the one that meets the select theme for the year. This year included 3 memoirs, a creative memoir and a work of fiction.

I decided on Homes as I think it was truly the most moving as my jaw-dropped when I learned about the age of the author sharing the story. It’s also an extremely important and timely topic that people in Canada need to read more about. While also being moving read, the book is also an extremely enjoyable read and I think it will come out as the fan-favourite this year too.


My Canada reads 2019 Favourites:

Soooo this was really hard! I changed my mind so many times about the book I enjoyed the most but in reality I enjoyed all the books but for different reasons. For example, Brother ended being my least favourite but I think it’s because it just didn’t fit in with the other books as it is the only full-on fiction book in the list. Susanne is a creative-memoir that had elements of truth and I found its prose beautiful. Homes and By Chance Alone were intensely moving, where with The Woo-Woo I found it both moving, shocking, humorous, and entertaining.