The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline

My first of five books from the Canada Reads 2018.

3/5 stars.
ebook,  184 pages.
Read from February 5, 2018 to February 11, 2018.

I’ll admit, I picked this book to read first because it was the shortest and it is the one I was the least excited about reading. YA books, while they can be enjoyable, often don’t satisfy any sort of intellectual need that I expect out books sometimes, especially ones that are in competition.

It is the future and we have out-worked ourselves and over-stretched our planet to the point of desolation. Instead of coming up with real solutions to combat the problem we have ended up working harder with the same old resources. We have worked so hard that we no longer dream. Like a plague, dreamlessness spreads itself across the globe and like having lost part of their soul, people are starting to go mad and are willing to do anything to regain back the ability to escape and to dream. There is one group of people who have somehow managed to not lose their ability to dream, the Native Americans, and with the spread of the epidemic, they are now being hunted for the dreams that live within the marrow of their bones.

“From where we were now, running, looking at reality from this one point in time, it seemed as though the world had suddenly gone mad. Poisoning your own drinking water, changing the air so much the earth shook and melted and crumbled, harvesting a race for medicine. How? How could this happen? Were they that much different from us? Would we be like them if we’d had a choice? Were they like us enough to let us live?”

Struggling to keep their culture and language alive while they are slowing be picked off by Recruiters for their marrow, small groups of natives are living out in the bush and having to move as much as possible to stay alive. You follow the story of fifteen-year-old Frenchie who has been separated from his family and has since joined up with another smaller group of Natives just trying to stay alive.

If the premise sounds a bit far off, like dreams in bone marrow, it is because it is and it was my major fault with this book. Sometimes dystopian premises can go a bit too far. However, this novel pays so much tribute to the Native American tradition of oral story-telling creating some amazing chapters and sequences in the writing style. The story is also a set reminder and reflection of what we have done to the Native Americans in our past and current history. There are many natives alive today that know all too well the horrors of the residential school systems in which they were forced into, robbing them of their culture and sometimes of their dignity which is exactly what is occurring this book.

The characters are easily relatable and you’re quick to like them, especially after hearing them recount their own stories. The author also does a good job in creating some very effective emotional and tragic scenes. It also wouldn’t be a YA novel without some romance which, wasn’t as bad as I was expecting. There were a few angsty-awkward romance moments but overall fairly believable, especially for teens.

The story ends with a satisfying but partial resolution making it look like this book is going to be the first in a series, another thing I hate about YA novels, but at least it wasn’t a cliffhanger ending.

So does this book meet the Canada Reads 2018 criteria? Does it open your eyes? Yes, in a metaphorical sense. It takes the issues facing Native Americans today in Canada and puts it a more somewhat palatable form. The connections that the author draws between the fictional world that Frenchie lives in and the world that real Natives live in are comparable and important, as are the environmental reflections, but will this book stand up to another with a more poignant story that is not dystopian? Personally, I can’t see it happening but I guess we will see what the other books bring to the table and how the debates are presented.

 

Just Announced! Canada Reads 2018 Shortlist

One book to open your eyes…

Huzzuh it’s time for Canada Reads 2018!

With Ali Hassan as the host and overseer, the five defenders will debate this year’s theme: One Book to Open Your Eyes.

tumblr_n1yus7L7QI1rb9puwo1_500.gif

Excited cat is excited. 

The contenders and their chosen books are:

I am personally looking forward to reading Mark Sakamoto’s novel! As always, I will read all five books and have my reviews and thoughts posted for your peep holes before the debates take place.

The debate takes place from March 26-29, 2018. The debates will air on CBC Radio One at 11 a.m., will be live-streamed on CBC Books at 11 a.m. ET and can be seen on CBC Television at 4 p.m.

It’s Here! 2018 Canada Reads Longlist

Finally!

The longlist has finally been announced! The theme this year is: One Book to Open Your Eyes.

“These books challenge readers to look differently at themselves, their neighbours and the world around them. ” – CBC Books, Jan 2018

What’s Canada Reads you ask?

“Five books, five champions, one winner: CBC’s annual Battle of the Books has been getting people listening, watching and, of course, reading, for the past 16 years.

Canada Reads is a “literary Survivor,” with celebrities championing books. Books are  voted “off the bookshelf,” one each day, until one book is chosen as the title the whole country should read this year.” – CBC Books, About

So without further ado, here they are:

I am the most excited for Mark Sakamoto’s novel which is the true story of his grandpa’s capture and imprisonment as a POW in Japan during the Second World War. I hope that it makes the short list!

The panellists and the final five books will be announced Jan. 30, 2018. The debates will take place March 26-29, 2018. I will hope to have all five final books read and reviewed before the upcoming debates so stay tuned for all the Canada Reads action.