Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War by Che Guevara

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3/5 stars.
Paperback, 320 pages.
Read from February 07 to 16, 2015.

I picked up this gem while I was actually in Cuba back in January of this year. It was my first trip to Cuba and I realized how little I knew about this fascinating little country with its big and expansive history. Thankfully there wasn’t a shortage of propaganda where I was staying. If I had more money and space in my suitcase I would have purchased quite a few more books.

Che is a remarkable individual and his dedication to Cuba and to the cause of communism is almost next to nothing. Che comes across as extremely intelligent and very articulate. His memoirs and diaries are published everywhere which probably makes him one of the most exposed politicians around. Don’t get me wrong, the Cuban government is pretty good at giving the leaders of their communist revolution a great reputation, and they have to. The history of Cuba is a rocky one, so the insurgence of this particular revolution was necessary for its time. From the Spanish to the British, and then the US, someone else was always taking advantage of Cuba and its people suffered for it. In 1933, Sergeant Fulgencio Batista threw a coup to overthrow Gerado Machado, a Cuban dictator known for his vicious rule. Sadly, after this coup, little changed under Batista’s rule. It was in 1953 when Fidel Castro made his  first attempt to revolt against Batista’s regime. It would be after this attack that a young Argentinian doctor named Ernesto Guevara would join the cause and assist in Cuba’s revolution and liberation.

“Che” is a form of colloquial Argentinian Spanish slang used in a vocative sense as “friend”. Che is the famous nickname given to Ernesto as a joke and term of endearment based on his heritage from his fellow Cuban comrades.

This book is a personal description of Che’s experiences during this pivotal revolution. Che spares no details with how difficult it was living in the forest for months at time and the sad deaths and sacrifices endured by all, especially the peasants of Cuba, who were initially afraid to assist or join the cause. His recollection is impressive as he remembers many of the names of some of the small time peasants who were essential in helping with the revolution that might have other wise been forgotten. He also details the specifics of those who betrayed the cause. Some he speaks of with remorse or honor and others with absolute distaste and resentment. It was exciting to see how big the small group of rebels became over such a short period of time . In 1959 the rebels send a group of 9000 strong into Havana, forcing Batista to flee, starting the beginning of a new era for Cuba, one that would bring positive change to the country and the lives of its people for the better.

From my own impressions of Cuba, some aspects of communism are no longer serving its people. Don’t read me wrong, I’m not saying that they need to replace their system with American capitalism but there are definitely areas that need improvement. The locals don’t have immediate access to some of the best food or clothes because they are too expensive and some people are still not allowed to leave specific regions of Cuba. Tourists get the best of everything, while they don’t. I was asked twice, discreetly, while I was there if I had any clothes or items that I was willing to part with. It made me pretty sad but if I wasn’t there as a tourist their economy and the people there would have even less. With tensions currently being mended between America and Cuba, as much as I don’t want this quaint country to become Americanized, it will eventually mean improvements for the locals.

Overall, a good description of the events and people that changed Cuba to make it the country that it is today.

Project Dermatillomania by Laura Barton

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5/5 stars.
Paperback, Colour Edition, 100 pages.
Read on March 14, 2014 .

I won’t toot my own horn too much here (as I am a contributor to this awesome novel) but for people who suffer or who have suffered from Dermatillomania this book is one of the first of its kind. Project Dermatillomania is written by people who know this disorder and deal with it everyday. They know what it feels like to be alone with the condition and through their own bravery and dedication all came together to share their stories to help others know that there is hope. These stories are personal, they’re artistic, beautiful and raw; ranging from pieces of art, graphic design, pictures and poetry from people from all over the world. They give an insight to the turmoils of Dermatillomania which is meant to be standing point of hope for sufferers and a basis of understanding and a resource for those that love them.

Having worked with all the people who helped bring this book together has been a blessing and I have made some great friends. I’m very proud of myself and of each of the individuals who have made this book possible. I highly recommend this book for anyone with Dermatillomania or for anyone who loves someone with Dermatillomania. Here is the purchase information:

All proceeds to be donated to the Canadian BFRB Support Network and the Trichotillomania Learning Center.
B&W Edition – Purchase – S13.99
Colour Edition – Purchase – $20.19
***An ebook edition is currently in the works***

If you have any questions or comments about the book please feel free to ask me. You can also reach out to: projectdermatillomania@gmail.com.

Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl

3/5 stars.
ebook, 154 pages.
Read from November 07 to 13, 2013.

“…everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last human freedoms–to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”

Viktor Frankl was a neurologist and psychiatrist as well as a Holocaust survivor. His observations as a scientist in combination with his experiences as a Holocaust victim allowed him to create a form of Psychotherapy called Logotherapy. Logotherapy was created with the Greek word “logos” which translates as “meaning” and is based off Kierkegaard’s “will to meaning”. This book was one of the first to define his new form of therapy which helped many Holocaust survivor’s get through their experiences.

This book is remarkable in so many ways and was unlike any Holocaust memoir that I’ve read. Viktor did not reiterate the horrors of the events he experienced but rather outlined what he did to get himself through it. Even more interestingly, was how academic the book was written. You don’t expect a memoir to be written in this manner but it was effective for what Viktor was trying to get across to his readers, which, in its simplest form, is about being able to choose a positive attitude, perspective and approach to your life and if you can find meaning within suffering. Or as Viktor quotes Nietzsche, “Those who have a ‘why’ to live, can bear with almost any ‘how‘”.  Viktor’s direct and brief writing style epitomizes his simple yet potent ideologies. However, if I had a criticism, I would say that his academic approach, while effective, I found that it takes way some of the emotional power of his story and his ideas a bit. With that also being said, his approach also meant that he was able to provide poignant advice without coming off like a self-help book.

Viktor’s story is inspirational and he truly makes us take a look at our own lives and what we have to grateful for and how we can use the power and reasoning of our minds to overcome any obstacle.  I would recommend this book to everyone as I believe that Viktor’s approach is effective and that we severely undermine the power of our own thoughts.