The Legend of Zelda – A Complete Development History by Ishaan Sahdev

4/5 stars.
ebook, 159 pages.
Read from July 23, 2020 to Aug 2, 2020.

Most people who know me know that I love video games, what most don’t know is that the Legend of Zelda games are my favourite. It was Ocarina of Time that first got me hooked on video games when I was 13 and it is a game that I haven’t stopped playing since. Since I adore the series so much I follow a variety of fan pages on social media which allows me to get any news related to the series as well as interesting discussions and memes. It was on one of these pages that I found this book.

You can read a copy for yourself from this site: https://zelda.gamepedia.com/Development_of_The_Legend_of_Zelda

My understanding is that a student wrote this book for their thesis and due to all the copyright restrictions from Nintendo had to make the book free to read in order to share it.  Having said that, this book doesn’t read like a thesis and is accompanied by beautiful images and graphic design that highlights different aspects of Nintendo’s history and the Zelda games giving it a really enticing and professional look.

The book talks about the humble beginnings of Nintendo and the main people that helped shape the company it is today. It also goes over how it had to adapt to the changing game markets not only as technology changed but as its target markets changed, as the West and Japan desired different styles of games. The main directive of the book is the development of the Zelda games and how their story was created and how its game play developed over time and with technology. The book includes interviews, in-depth research and references to give a highly accurate timeline of the creation of the Zelda series, with each chapter dedicated to each of the major Zelda releases.

I found I was the most interested the Zelda games that I loved the most, obviously, but I found that the few games I wasn’t bothered about not as engaging which, is likely not the author’s fault. My favourite aspects of this book was learning how the Zelda series came to be, what inspired it, and especially about the people who have shaped and made it the loved series that it is. I would recommend this read to anyone who is interested in video games and has a love for Nintendo or the Zelda series.

Monstress, Vol 1: Awakening by Marjorie M. Liu

“To quote the poets… we’re fucked.”

4/5 stars.
ebook, 208 pages.
Read from July 8, 2020 to July 9, 2020.

After some high praise and recommendations from many avid readers, I waited patiently for this stunning graphic novel to become available at my library. It took about a year but my library finally added this series.

In the steampunk setting of the glamorous city of  Zamora, Maika, a young teen is looking for answers and revenge. The Cumaea fear the magical Arcanics and the war has taken inhumane turns against the Arcanics as a result of this fear. Maika is Arcanic but looks human, not that it stopped her from being persecuted, enslaved and worse during the peak of the war. Maika is a hardened survivor of war, trauma, and abuse, who also happens to share a mysterious link to an ancient demon making her immensely powerful, feared, and wanted. Maika struggles to control this entity within her as she also struggles to cope with the trauma that this war has left her and the relationships she may have sabotaged.  As you learn more about what has shaped Maika, you come to see how deep her trauma is and how hardened to emotion is she has become.

Monstress is one of the most imaginative stories I’ve ever read, especially when accompanied with the stunning artwork that is both gorgeous and at times shockingly gruesome. Trauma, which is a central part of Monstress, was inspired by the author’s grandmother, who escaped Japanese occupation during WWII. This additional personal detail really adds a further layer of depth to this already emotional plot. The artwork is perfectly paired with this story as the images are emotional, raw, dark and brutal, just like war. The story also emboldens women and feminine strength with both the protagonist and antagonists of the stories, the society that Maika lives in is also matriarchal.

My one complaint with this story is there is a lot of detail to take in for a graphic novel. It was difficult to get the full scope of the world that Maika and her companions live in as it’s of a lot of details to take in at one time. I often found myself back tracking to go over a detail I missed or didn’t retain. In some ways I wish that this graphic novel had been written as novel with accompanying images. Yes, it would have made the book a lot longer but I think it would have helped to make it easier to digest the world and history Zamora. It was clever to have the Professor delve out these history lessons as interludes between chapters but they were long and winded at times which is what made me think a proper novel might have lent itself better to the story, with the images as well, of course. The artwork is just as central to this story as the plot itself.

I’m thrilled to have such a unique series to read and can’t wait to see what is next for Maika and how the rest of the story will unfold. I would highly recommend this to anyone who loves graphic novels, fantasy, war stories, or just an appreciation for moving, beautiful and brutal artwork.

Why We Swim by Bonnie Tsui

“How nice it would be to die swimming toward the sun.” —Le Corbusier

4/5 stars.
ebook, 203 pages.
Read from July 5, 2020 to July 8, 2020.

I can’t remember how I found this book but I must have put it on hold at the library after reading about it somewhere. I was a competitive swimmer for the majority of my youth so I have always had a close connection with water, making this read a no-brainer. As a species, you could say that we’re really not meant to swim. We are in many ways, the least adapted to do it and yet we’re drawn to it and how it makes us feel. Whether its a pool, ocean or river, we are drawn to what the water gives us.

Bonnie Tsui is a swimmer and wanted to explore the deep connection that humans make with water. She talks to people from around their world with their unique experiences with swimming.  The author explores the science on what happens to our bodies in water and how some are capable of changing and adapting to its environment. The author visits Iceland to swim in its waters and to talk to a minor celebrity whose uniquely adapted body allowed him to survive in freezing water for more than 6 hours as he swam to safety after his fishing boat sank. He was the only one on the ship to survive. In Iceland, swimming is ingrained in every community as an important survival skill and beloved pastime. The author talks to renowned open water swimmers and Olympians, to those living in wartime Bagdad where swimming lessons occurred amidst the war, to Japan with its unique history of samurai swimming, all to explore the many ways that we find solace, danger, and challenge in water.

If you don’t swim or have an aversion to water, this book likely won’t speak to you. However, it may help you understand why many are drawn to water when you’re less inclined. For me, this book told me much of what I already felt and knew when it came to my experiences with water. It was wonderful to follow this author’s journey and feel her passion and get the science and history behind some of the unique aspects of our relationship with water.  This book is a subtle love letter to water, a thank-you, an expression of appreciation and an insight into our relationship with it. The writing is concise and really gives you a feel for the people that the author is interviewing as well as insights into her own passion and history with water creating a well-rounded and accessible non-fiction read.

If this book sounds at all intriguing to you, then I would highly recommend reading it. It’s short and sweet and made me look up a few further interesting facts and stories based on what the author discussed. Like samurai swimming, I just had to know what it looked like. Trust me, you won’t be disappointed.